James R. Arthur

The President of the United States takes great pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross to Warrant Officer James R. Arthur for heroism while participating in aerial flight: Warrant Officer Arthur distinguished himself by heroic actions on 12 October 1967, while serving as the team leader of two armed helicopters at Cu Chi, Republic of Vietnam. Orbiting over a hot landing zone in support of a dust-off ship, Warrant Officer Arthur’s team was unable to establish communications with ground forces. Consequently both aircraft were forced to hold their fire while absorbing heavy automatic weapons fire from the enemy. Despite the extreme danger, Warrant Officer Arthur continued to maneuver his ship, drawing the enemy fire and protecting the dust-off ship until it had evacuated the wounded. Although his ship had been hit already, when his wingman spotted the location of the enemy fire, Warrant Officer Arthur led his gun team on an assault of the position. On the third pass, although his pilot was wounded and his ship hit three times, his team succeeded in neutralizing the enemy position. Due to Warrant Officer Arthur’s aggressive leadership and sound judgment, the mission was successfully completed and the enemy position destroyed. His personal bravery and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.*************

2) The President of the United States takes great pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross to Warrant Officer James R. Arthur for heroism while participating in aerial flight. Warrant Officer Arthur distinguished himself by heroic actions on 29 January 1968, while serving as the Aircraft Commander of a UH-1C helicopter from D Troop, 3d Squadron, 4th Cavalry in the Republic of Vietnam. When the lead aircraft came under heavy automatic weapons fire, Warrant Officer Arthur immediately placed suppressive fire on the enemy to enable the lead ship to escape. When a friendly platoon of infantryman became pinned down by enemy fire, he made numerous low level passes at reduced air speed to enable himself to place more accurate and effective fire on the enemy positions. He continued in this manner throughout the day and into the night with only brief return trips to Cu Chi to refuel and resupply. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the defeat of the enemy force. Warrant Officer Arthur’s personal bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.