Gary P. Bergeron

1) The President of the United States takes great pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross to Major Gary P. Bergeron for heroism while participating in aerial flight evidenced by voluntary actions above and beyond the call of duty. Major Bergeron distinguished himself by heroic actions while performing duties as Aircraft Commander on a CH-47A helicopter in support of the 9th Infantry Division near Cai Lay, Republic of Vietnam. His helicopter was engaged in a combat mission when diverted by an alert order to an emergency ammunition resupply to the artillery batteries, which were heavily engaged with the enemy. Two UH-1 helicopters had been shot down and other aircraft reported continual fire directed towards them. Disregarding his personal safety, he took off under night-instrument conditions and penetrated violent thunderstorms to make a low approach through the intense enemy fire over unfamiliar terrain. He persisted in carrying out the mission until the surrounded artillery battery indicated they had sufficient shell to sustain them until daylight hours. A total of five sorties were made under the most severe conditions and were completed at 0400 hours. His heroic actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

2) The President of the United States takes great pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross to Major Gary P. Bergeron for heroism while participating in aerial flight evidenced by voluntary actions above and beyond the call of duty. Major Bergeron distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions as Air Mission Commander near Rach Soi. During a normal visual reconnaissance, he noticed an unusually large gathering of sampans off shore. The scout ship reported that all of the occupants were military-aged males, and there was no fishing gear visible. After receiving clearance, Major Bergeron instructed his scouts to engage the sampans and occupants which resulted in fifteen sampans destroyed and forty-one enemy killed. Later, he flew through extremely bad weather with very poor visibility and no gun cover to successfully deposit the ground unit commander with his troops. Major Bergeron’s devotion to duty and superior flying ability were vital in the successful completion of the mission. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.